Should 4053 homeowners be worried about the way it’s changing

Should 4053 homeowners be worried about the way it’s changing?

 

There’s been a bit of news coverage lately about development applications for medium-density buildings in and around Mitchelton and Everton Park.

Everyone from local residents and activist groups to MPs have commented on the issue.

Could it be that new developments in our area might not be a good idea?

There’s been a bit of news coverage lately about development applications for medium-density buildings in and around Mitchelton and Everton Park.

Everyone from local residents and activist groups to MPs have commented on the issue, but there doesn’t seem to be a consensus on whether growth and development will be a good or bad thing.

On one hand, some say that allowing higher-density building will ruin 4053’s leafy appeal and cause traffic chaos.

On the other hand, some argue that it will promote business and strengthen the area’s appeal to the lucrative city-worker market.

So, as a homeowner, should you be worried? Could there be any affect on the value of your home? Here are some thinking points to consider:

How major are the proposed developments?

The proposed developments are classed as “medium density”, meaning they’re bigger than duplexes or walk-up townhouses, but they’re not 20-storey skyscrapers.

Some large proposals (100 units or so) have been approved, but others have been denied – including a 66-apartment development on Osborne Rd. In the greater scheme of things, these aren’t mega projects, but they do still make an impact on the areas where they go in.

Should 4053 homeowners be worried about the way it’s changing

Everyone who lives around here treasures the greenery and kid-friendly environment we’re lucky enough to have – this is why we have an above-average proportion of houses vs. units.

But this doesn’t necessarily mean that a couple of unit blocks are going to detract from anything. It could rejuvenate the housing market and create increased demand for subdivision-ready blocks.

Can our infrastructure support it?

The main argument against these developments comes from groups like the MAG (Mitchelton Action Group), which says that any large developments will clog up all our roads and cause gridlock.

But for homeowners in the area, would a lack of infrastructure cause property values to fall? Or might it spur the council into amending its public transport or road-building plans to better service the area?

It’ll be interesting to see what happens when the new Masters and Woolworths stores open in the next week or two – there will be hundreds of new jobs created, but also a bit more traffic…

How have past developments turned out?

When Brookside Shopping Centre went in, it created jobs and provided vastly improved amenities to the Mitchelton area. And jobs and amenities are a good thing!

Most of Brisbane’s inner suburbs have steadily gentrified and rocketed in property value, but in some rare cases, unchecked growth and development have flopped (like in the CBD with its oversupply of luxury condos).

Either way, all development proposals in Mitchelton will have to meet the requirements of the MCNP (Mitchelton Centre Neighbourhood Plan), which gives very detailed guidelines on what can and can’t be built.

Is it appropriate?

This is probably the biggest issue most people have with the idea of development and increased density.

We like our quiet, tree-lined streets. Flashy office or unit blocks might take away some of the charm of our neighbourhoods.

But then again, as long as any developments are in keeping with the MCNP, they might just breathe a bit of fresh air into our areas and bring a new influx of demand into our local community and property market.

What do you think?

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